• Steelhead, Dean River British Columbia.

    The Steelhead With A Thousand Faces

    Maybe if I take five more steps, throw one more mend, skate one more fly, a hero will appear, armored in chrome, and dance to the music of my singing reel.

  • Grey Reef section of the North Platte

    The Birth of A Fishing Town

    Calf deep now in the cold river, Trent’s completed his prelude of silky false casts and is ready to start the show in earnest.

  • Commercial: Authentic imagery makes your story come to life and connects you to customers.

    In The End, Style Might Be All We Have

    Over the course of 6 trips, in and out, and nearly 40 miles, I question whether or not it’s worth it.

  • Photo by Steven Brutger

    Banded

    Folding neatly the greenhead splashed soundly onto the water. The old lady made quick work of the retrieve.

The butterflies in your stomach are not mistaken.

As you plan your next hunting or fishing trip, put some thought into who you invite to go with you. It might be the most important decision you make.

Turns out you can learn a lot from a six-year-old with a book. You may even land a whole new way to enjoy the beach.

I started shooting in the spring and slowly began to get the hang of things. Summer travel put a dent in my practice schedule and scouting has been non existent. Now I’m scrambling to get ready.

Clearly fish can sense when one’s focus is trained, heart and soul, on a drift, and as importantly when it’s not. Something about our attention, or maybe our intention, is tipping them off.

Six days, five nights and one of the most impressive rivers in the lower forty eight. Cut through the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness, the Middle Fork of the Salmon is as good as it gets.

Not every day has to be a hardcore adventure. Sometimes you just need to move.

Will the family all in on the action we caught fish until we were too tired to continue. Satiated, we roasted marshmallows over a fire, discussed the finer points of making smores, weather or not fish have tongues, and why we can’t hunt domestic cows.

I have to imagine the U.S. Olympic skeet team’s training regimen is a little more disciplined. Of course, they’re gunning for something altogether different.

When I began my apprenticeship as an alpinist, someone told me, “to be successful in the mountains, one’s ability to suffer is mandatory.” Turns out it’s helpful in elk hunting too.